The University of Ottawa has been awarded three new Canada Research Chairs

Posted on Tuesday, November 13, 2018

 professors Kelly Bronson, Mireille Khacho and Maxime Rousseaux, holders of the new Canada Research Chairs

From left to right: professors Kelly Bronson, Mireille Khacho and Maxime Rousseaux, holders of the new Canada Research Chairs

The University of Ottawa has been awarded three new Canada Research Chairs (CRC) that will expand the scope of research in the fields of health and the environment. The University is also proud to announce the renewal of three CRCs that will strengthen the University’s expertise in these fields.This represents a total investment of $5.7 million from the Canada Research Chairs Program.

“The attribution of these chairs will allow brilliant researchers to continue to pursue important research issues,” said Sylvain Charbonneau, vice-president, research at the University. “Thanks to support from the Canada Research Chairs Program, these professors will advance our knowledge of topics that affect the daily lives of Canadians.” 

The three new Canada Research Chairs were awarded to:

Kelly Bronson – Canada Research Chair in Science and Society

Kelly Bronson studies the effects of digitizing traditional sectors, such as agriculture and mining. Her research aims to foster the responsible governance of emergent and controversial technologies and to promote justice and equity in Canada’s  food and energy systems.

Mireille Khacho – Canada Research Chair in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Regenerative Medicine

Mireille Khacho aims to understand the mechanisms by which mitochondria — structures found in cells which produce energy — control muscle stem cell longevity. In an effort to restore the regenerative potential of muscle in degenerative disorders and aging, she will create therapeutic strategies to change mitochondrial dynamics and function in stem cells.

Maxime Rousseaux – Canada Research Chair in Personalized Genomics of Neurodegeneration

Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), impose a devastating medical, emotional and economic burden on Canadians. Maxime Rousseaux’s research will help the medical community and patients with these debilitating diseases by defining the functional significance of genetic variants that are currently not well understood.

The three Canada Research Chairs that were renewed are:

Laurie Chan – Canada Research Chair in Toxicology and Environmental Health

Laurie Chan studies the toxic effects of chemical contaminants on wildlife and humans.  Chan has worked with indigenous peoples across Canada to address their food safety and security issues.  Chan and his team develop innovative approaches to study health determinants at the local, regional and global levels.

Anthony Heyes – Canada Research Chair in Environmental Economics

Anthony Heyes’s research provides insight into the impact of pollution and climate change, and how to better regulate polluting activities. Using novel data sources, such as social media and court records, he explores the effects of pollution and extreme climate on non-health outcomes, such as workplace productivity, absenteeism, risk aversion and violent behaviour.

William Stanford – Canada Research Chair in Integrative Stem Cell Biology

William Stanford uses systems biology to analyze stem cell and cancer biology and to develop new therapies based on precision medicine. His research aims to find biomarkers to monitor and diagnose disease and could lead to new therapies to treat a variety of conditions, including cancer.

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