A Revolution in Neuroscience

Une personne qui porte un casque sensoriel pour des expériences de neuroscience menées par l’Institut de recherche sur le cerveau et le psychisme

Our 150 scientists and clinicians have exceptional knowledge of neural regeneration and repair. We also have bench strength in basic neuroscience, in probing the complicated pathways and circuitry related to disease and recovery.

We foster new connections between researchers, clinicians and patients. Findings from our labs give clinicians better options for their patients, while results from the clinics provide new leads for scientists. Our expertise in knowledge translation will help us turn discoveries and advances into high-quality, evidence-based health care faster. We also educate the public on brain health and disease prevention.

You have an opportunity to be part of a neuroscience revolution, to support research that will unlock the healing power of the human brain and improve the quality of life for patients. Your support will help us give ill and aging Canadians more good years by discovering and implementing more effective treatments. Together, we will build one of the leading neuro-science centres in the world.

uOBMRI has made great progress thanks to the generosity of our donors. 

We are proud to say that 100% of your generous contributions go directly towards supporting our research and clinical programs.

The Power to Protect, Repair, Regenerate

Your support will help the uOttawa Brain and Mind Research Institute launch three landmark initiatives:

  • Integrated Parkinson’s Care Network: This network will serve patients by offering them one place where they will be treated for all aspects of their conditions, including dementia and depression. We will also conduct clinical care research on how to improve the lives of patients and carry out clinical trials and epidemiological studies on how to enhance the brain’s ability to protect and repair itself in Parkinson’s patients.
  • Encouraging Regeneration after Stroke: Regeneration holds enormous promise in the treatment of stroke, the third leading cause of death in Canada. The uOBMRI has a large team of researchers working on the brain’s post-stroke regenerative powers. This program is unique in the world – it will marry basic science with clinical care to find new ways to promote recovery and regeneration in the hours and days after a patient suffers a stroke.
  • Vision 2020: This ambitious suicide-prevention program aims to reduce suicide in the Ottawa region by 20% by 2020. The program will focus on identifying and managing depression better through primary care and will also target high risk groups. It will also involve public education and working with the media on responsible ways to report suicide. This is the first step towards a national suicide prevention program.
  • The uOBMRI-CIG has drawn together community champions (survivors, caregivers, community providers) and leading concussion researchers/clinicians to focus on the growing and pressing needs of those struggling with concussions. Major challenges for those suffering from concussion include timely access to appropriate care, predicting whether injury will lead to chronic impairment, and understanding optimal timing for engaging in/ resuming activities.

As we build our reputation and track record, we will add additional new projects on neuromuscular disease, multiple sclerosis, dementia and concussive brain and spinal cord injury. We already have highly-regarded research and clinical programs in these areas.

The uOttawa Brain and Mind Research Institute has strong partnerships with The Ottawa Hospital, the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Royal of the Royal Ottawa Health Care Group and the University of Ottawa Institute of Mental Health Research, Bruyère Continuing Care, the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and CHEO Research Institute, l’Hôpital Montfort and Institut de recherche de l’Hôpital Montfort. Additionally, five uOttawa faculties are involved: Medicine, Science, Health Sciences, Education and Social Sciences.

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